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Cancer: New drug offers hope after unsuccessful chemotherapy


Improved treatment of cancer through BOS172722?

A new drug can block a molecule that plays a key role in cancer cell division. This could significantly improve the treatments for some forms of cancer.

The Institute of Cancer Research's latest investigation found that a special drug could revolutionize the treatment of cancer in the future. The results of the study were published in the English-language journal "Molecular Cancer Therapeutics".

How does the new drug work?

The drug, called BOS172722, works by blocking MPS1, a molecule that plays an important key role in cell division. The molecule is involved in the distribution of the chromosomes and ensures an even distribution. Blocking the molecule speeds up the process, causing cancer cells to have the wrong number of chromosomes and die.

Drug works well for breast, ovarian and lung cancer

Rapidly dividing cells from breast, ovary and lung cancer were particularly sensitive to the new drug. The drug works particularly well in combination with chemotherapy for triple negative breast cancer cells, the researchers report. With this deadliest form of breast cancer, there are few successful forms of treatment.

Drug can make chemotherapy effective again

It is crucial for an improved treatment of cancer that the combination can be effective in cancer patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy alone. This has the potential to become an urgently needed additional treatment option that could extend the life of patients, the researchers said.

MPS1 inhibitor outwits cancer

Cancer's ability to develop and become drug-resistant is a cause of the vast majority of deaths from the disease. The new MPS1 inhibitor is a good example of a drug that can fight cancer by outsmarting the disease. In return, it blocks an important evolutionary escape route for cancer cells, through which the disease often eludes treatment. If chemotherapy has already lost effectiveness in patients, the new drug in combination with chemotherapy could make treatment possible again. (as)

Author and source information

This text corresponds to the specifications of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical doctors.

Swell:

  • Simon J. Anderhub, Grace Wing-Yan Mak, Mark D. Gurden, Amir Faisal, Konstantinos Drosopoulos et al .: High Proliferation Rate and a Compromised Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Confers Sensitivity to the MPS1 Inhibitor BOS172722 in Triple-Negative Breast Cancers, in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics (query: 07.10.2019), Molecular Cancer Therapeutics



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